Celtic – Trinity Knot & Shamrocks Oh My!

Celtic jewelry is one of the most popular types of jewelry due to its subtle beauty and great, deep meaning. It’s as lovely and meaningful as a field of daisies on a spring, dewy morning. The icing on the cake is that you definitely do not have to be of Irish descent to don one of these significant pieces of jewelry.

Celtic Cross – Found all throughout Ireland, England, Scotland, and bordering Celtic islands, the Celtic cross is a kind of ornate cross that dates to the periods of the Druids and St. Patrick. The cross itself can come in an array of designs and symbols.

Celtic SpiralsCeltic Spirals – The triple celtic spiral is also known as the triskele, is symbolic of the “Three realms”, land, sea and sky. It is also thought to be symbolic of human pregnancy, each period broken up into three trimesters so it also makes sense it’s symbolic of fertility as well. It’d be a most excellent gift for a recently pregnant woman.

Shamrock – Good luck, that’s what most people think when they hear about a shamrock. However, it’s said that St. Patrick picked up a three-leaf clover to demonstrate the holy trinity while he was preaching. The Shamrock possibly wards off bad spirits.

Celtic Knots – The knots, in essence, are never ending. It stands for “no beginning, no ending” and a binding together of two souls or spirits. Many of these knots have been so popular that Christianity has often adopted it into their manuscripts and artifacts. Knots with a square shape are characterized by shields, symbols of protections.

Trinity KnotTrinity knot, a kind of Celtic Knot– A simple, Celtic symbol is the trinity knot. Like the shamrock, the three sided knot was metaphoric for the trinity, father son and holy spirit. It’s also associated with the number three such as the stages of womanhood: maid, mother, crone or elements like earth, fire, and water. The trinity knot has existed long before the Celtic cross.

Tree of life – This symbol is easy to explain, as it’s a common symbol in many cultures. At one point in time, Britain was covered by a lush, mighty forest. With roots that were deep within the earth, and branches that were often interlocked, the tree of life has become a meaningful representation of life, heaven and earth.

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